George
Hanniff, George Edward a 25 year resident of the South Bay, passed away on Friday, November 18, 2005 in Torrance. Born in Bronx, NY, George was 79 when he died. He is survived by his Wife, Brigid Hanniff, Daughters, Mary Boujikian & Brigid Jeffries, Sons, Tom, Richard, George & Michael Hanniff, Brother, Thomas Hanniff and 11 Grandchildren. He served his country first in the Navy and reenlisted in the Marine Corps where he earned his wings. After his military service, George flew for Pan American and Trans Caribbean Airways before settling down as a computer programmer. George and Brigid enjoyed 45 years of marriage A gathering of family & friends will be Tuesday, November, 22, 2005, 6:00 P.M. to 9:00 P.M. with the Rosary at 7:30 P.M. both at Rice Mortuary in Torrance. The Funeral Mass will be Wednesday, November, 23, 2005, 10:00 A.M. at St. James Catholic Church in Redondo Beach, CA. In lieu of flowers please give your loved ones a hug, today.

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  1. Dear Bridie and Family, Denise just showed me the Memory Book. What a wonderful tribute to George. I had the privilege of growing up with him on a Hun Thirty Eighth Street. We were all one big family in the South Bronx, and still feel so close to each other whenever we meet after all these years. I guess I feel related to him too since he married you, Bridie and you became our extended family. Even though Denise and I were just in Arizona for the very sad occasion of Geney’s death, I am so glad that we got to see George and that we were part of the girls that he told to line up!!! He left us with so many happy memories of him. I know how much you miss him, but you will be comforted by the wonderful life you had together and the beautiful family that you have. You are all in our thoughts and prayers. Love, Marian Sullivan

  2. I remember Mr. Hanniff as a very nice man and neighbor from New York. He was also an awesome stickball player. When we went to visit Mary in Arizona back in 1996, he still had the homerun swing! I was on his team which won the game. You will be missed, but remembered as the stickball king from New York!

  3. Sorry to hear about Mr. Hanniff. The first thing I thought about when I seen his name in the paper was playing stick ball at Flavion school with his sons and daughter and all his other friends. Rest in peace, Karl & Delores Richter

  4. The moment that sticks out the most for me was years ago I came over really early in the morning to pick up Brigid because we were driving together to go camping, and Mr. Hanniff being an early bird was up and let me in and then talked to me while Brigid got ready.

  5. The thing I remember Mr. Hanniff enjoying was coming to our softball games, Him and Mrs. Hanniff sitting in the shade out on the leftfield side, and after the game everyone going over and having a cold beer. To the Hanniff Family, Sorry for you loss. He will be missed.

  6. I sure do miss the church softball games with Mr. Hanniff having a cold one in one hand and coaching the team from the stands. Sorry for the loss and Happy Thanksgiving to everyone. Karl & Delores Richter

  7. One memory that stands out is one time at a “Game Night” that Brigid and Bill were hosting. I had just started dating Rich so I was a little nervous. Of course everyone made me feel welcome and part of the family. George and I ended up being Password partners. I instantly got nervous. I think George sensed it and started to joke around with me, “Alright Brooke, get your thinking cap on.” We ended up blowing everyone out of the water. Thanks for a great game George!

  8. I’m very sorry about the passing of George. I only met him in the last couple of years, when he’d be a fixture, along with his wife, Brigid, and their golden retriever, picnicking off the left field foul line for our St. James softball games in Torrance. What a sweet man, and clearly a baseball fan. As we gathered around them for post-game “refreshments”, he often gave me praise for clutch hits, and kindly zingers for my occasional outfield miscues :). When our two families officially got together via Rich and Brooke, he was very warm, and welcoming – very much like a second Dad. Clearly he was a man I wish I had met much earlier, but am grateful for having met him… and can see, from a glimpse at his character, how his sons and daughters grew to be such terrific human beings. God speed on this, your final, and greatest, flight, captain. Rest in peace, Mr. Hanniff.

  9. It is really nice to read the kind words, thanks to all. This is a copy of what my brother Rich read at Dad’s service……. On behalf of myself and my family, I’d like to say thanks to all you for coming here today. My father was a remarkable man who enjoyed a good get-together and would be very pleased with today’s attendance. A little history of my father. He was a product of New York, born in 1926 to Tom Hanniff and Mary Kennedy of the Bronx. He was the second of three boys, his brothers being Rich and Thomas. He was one of the Hun-Tirty Eighth street’s finest. He did well in school. He was finishing high school while World War II was going on and decided he wanted to join the fight. He enrolled in a V-6 flight program with the Navy and attended flight school. Upon completion he was given the choice to continue with the Navy or go into the Marines. Figuring he’d have more opportunities for hard-surface landings, he chose the Marine Reserve. He flew several planes, with the Corsair being among his favorites. He had a 6 year career with the military before flying for several commercial carriers. He also obtained a degree in Accounting. At about this time he began courting my mom. They met at Greenwood Lake. My dad had a magnetism about him and my mom was hooked. Not long afterwards, a marriage followed and the first of his kids. His love for flying was ended with a layoff from Pan Am and a child on the way. He could no longer wait for the call back. He started work on Long Island as a programmer and Mary was born shortly thereafter. He later transferred over to Con Edison in Manhattan. He would commute on the Long Island Rail Road for the next 19 years, accumulating promotions and five more kids on the way. He had been introduced to California whilst flying and after getting grounded he thought of getting back out there someday. In 1980 the entire family picked up and moved to Torrance. He was a system’s analyst at this time and started his own consulting business. He retired in 1990. He first became ill about a year ago. He spent some time in a convalescent home while he went through rehabilitation. It was not a pleasant time for him or anyone in the family and he vowed to not go back. With the heroic efforts of my mom and brothers and God, he did not have to go back. He had a great eye for the ladies and he picked a winner. My dad finally succumbed to a massive stroke on Friday morning. He lapsed into unconsciousness early that morning and passed late that night.

  10. Thanks again to all who have shared.. I will be in touch with you soon, Hey Karl, I will write soon. I would like to share one more to share, this is from my brother Tom’s reading at the service………………… He was smart, funny, a guy you’d want to sit down and talk with. He loved to laugh. And he loved to make people laugh. He loved his family, his stocks and his stories. He was everything from a fighter pilot to Reverend. His dead-pan humor had you riveted to his every word. Many a night during family gatherings, a crowd would pull up chairs next to pops to listen to him. You would always here, “…and there I was…” His love of flying was surpassed only by that for his family. He kept his humor to the end. We recently lost our cousin Gene in Arizona and Dad wanted to make the trip out there for family. Although not being in the best of health, he put on his best face and when he entered Dan and Mercy’s house, seeing the entire family for the first time in a long time, simply called out to the crowd, “…line up ladies…” It was as if a rock start entered the room. He loved stick ball and pool. He loved picnics and kids and coolers . You think tailgate parties were started by football fans. I beg to differ, they began when the first time my dad had to attend a funeral. He coached baseball and basketball. He had the patented calling out with one leg lifted and the clipboard up to his mouth yelling for his players to adjust their positions. He loved dancing. And I’m told he could make his partner feel like a princess. He loved books. And was always looking for a deal down at the Barnes and Noble in downtown New York. He would literally bump into his older brother, Richie, there. At Gene’s funeral service, Joe painted a beautiful picture of our deceased relatives gathering for a picnic up in heaven. I know Dad is joining them, there. Dad used to say, any landing you walk away from is a good landing. He loved the St James softball team. Among his favorite things in life; Getting his wings Getting his wife Buzzing (or doing a fly-by) of his parents house and then flying under the Whitestone Bridge Working at Yankee Stadium as a teenager and getting all the players signatures Landing his Corsair on a carrier Winning the Long Island stickball tournament… Heaven’s a little bit brighter today. And certainly, a little bit louder.

  11. Like George said, thanks for everyone’s thoughts and prayers. It has certainly helped our family give my father the send-off he deserved. And we really appreciate those of you who had to travel so far to pay tribute. Thank you. George, here’s the version I ended up reading… That’s the saddest part about today; that we have to say goodbye to a man we loved and admired. I really appreciate all the kind words everyone had about my Dad last night, both during Deacon Shinkle’s service and afterwards. My sister, reminded me that it’s not just us losing our father. But everyone here is losing someone they cared for deeply. A wise friend of mine told me once that people are only on loan to us and we have to make the most of the time you have together. No truer words have been spoken. But it sure hurts to see them go. The good part about today is that we’re remembering all those great times we had together. And we’ll always have those memories. Dad certainly was something else. As my brother, Rich, mentioned, he crammed so much into one lifetime. And my cousin Joe pointed out, you just can’t replace that card in the deck. He was one of a kind. And the memories we have are plentiful. Let me mention a few that we’ve talked about recently. His brother Tom recounted the story of when Dad got his wings and had to take a cross country flight. He was in Texas at the time and chose to fly home, to New York. After his visit, he told Tom that he was going to buzz the house. Before Dad could fly by, their Uncle happened to stop over just as Dad was flying low and loud over their neighborhood. His Uncle asked, “Who was the heck is that crazy so and so?” to which Uncle Tom replied, “That’s your nephew, George” And then Dad proceeded to fly under the Whitestone Bridge before heading back to Texas. My sister, Brigid recalls how he loved the beach. He’d take us down there most every weekend and teach us to body surf and dive into waves. And how he loved bagels and Irish Festivals. And Mary recalls how boisterous Dad can be. We’d vacation to Dude ranches and they had a bar on the premises. We could always here Dad laughing and horsing around. My brother, George remembers Dad teaching us how to drive long before we were legal. He’d sit us on his lap and let us steer. And I don’t think Dad ever regretted those lessons, even after young George took a couple of Unauthorized road trips with the family wagon. Last night Mike was remembering how Dad showed his love for his family with actions instead of words. We weren’t big on expressing our emotions, especially saying the L – word: Love. We’re getting a little better in that department, but we still think actions speak louder. Rich remembers some of Dad’s favorite shows like Lawrence Welk and Jeopardy and the Wheel of Fortune and then there’s the History channel. It was a pretty safe bet, that when you walked in the house either Victory at Sea or World at War were on. And, with Dad’s hearing going south, they were on loudly. And I remember how he kept his humor to the end. We recently lost our cousin Gene in Arizona and Dad really wanted to make the trip out there despite his poor health. He put on his best face and attended the funeral and the gathering afterwards over at Dan and Mercy’s. He did OK, but everyone knew he wasn’t his old self. When it came time to leave, he somehow pulled it together and called out, “…line up ladies…” That lit up the room. That would be the last time many of us saw him. Also at Gene’s funeral service, Joe painted a beautiful picture with words of our deceased relatives gathering for a picnic up in heaven. I can see Dad walking up to join them, cooler in hand, with our dogs, Bud and Lady at his side. Today Heaven is a little bit brighter, and certainly, a little bit louder. And Mom remembers their nightly Jeopardy matches and how one time she and I conspired to beat Dad. He usually won but this time I happened to travel out of state and I happened to call home while Jeopardy was on. I could easily hear the show in the background and it turned out we were one episode ahead of them. So the next night I wrote all the answers down and e-mailed Mom. The following night she was ready. And got most of the answers before my Dad. But, she tried to do a thinking-pause a couple times to make it look authentic, and that left Dad enough time to answer ahead of her. And, finally, Mom remembers their bedtime goodnights. She’d say goodnight and he’d start singing Always, ….. A song they shared. We love you, Dad. You’ll be missed. But you’ll be remembered, ALWAYS.

  12. Like George said, thanks for everyone’s thoughts and prayers. It comforted our family while we gave my father the send-off he deserved. And thanks to all who had to travel so far in order to pay tribute, it meant so much. Thank you. George, here’s the version I ended up reading… That’s the saddest part about today; that we have to say goodbye to a man we loved and admired. I really appreciate all the kind words everyone had about my Dad last night, both during Deacon Shinkle’s service and afterwards. My sister, reminded me that it’s not just us losing our father. But everyone here is losing someone they cared for deeply. A wise friend of mine told me once that people are only on loan to us and we have to make the most of the time you have together. No truer words have been spoken. But it sure hurts to see them go. The good part about today is that we’re remembering all those great times we had together. And we’ll always have those memories. Dad certainly was something else. As my brother, Rich, mentioned, he crammed so much into one lifetime. And my cousin Joe pointed out, you just can’t replace that card in the deck. He was one of a kind. And the memories we have are plentiful. Let me mention a few that we’ve talked about recently. His brother Tom recounted the story of when Dad got his wings and had to take a cross country flight. He was in Texas at the time and chose to fly home, to New York. After his visit, he told Tom that he was going to buzz the house. Before Dad could fly by, their Uncle happened to stop over just as Dad was flying low and loud over their neighborhood. His Uncle asked, “Who was the heck is that crazy so and so?” to which Uncle Tom replied, “That’s your nephew, George” And then Dad proceeded to fly under the Whitestone Bridge before heading back to Texas. My sister, Brigid recalls how he loved the beach. He’d take us down there most every weekend and teach us to body surf and dive into waves. And how he loved bagels and Irish Festivals. And Mary recalls how boisterous Dad can be. We’d vacation to Dude ranches and they had a bar on the premises. We could always here Dad laughing and horsing around. My brother, George remembers Dad teaching us how to drive long before we were legal. He’d sit us on his lap and let us steer. And I don’t think Dad ever regretted those lessons, even after young George took a couple of Unauthorized road trips with the family wagon. Last night Mike was remembering how Dad showed his love for his family with actions instead of words. We weren’t big on expressing our emotions, especially saying the L – word: Love. We’re getting a little better in that department, but we still think actions speak louder. Rich remembers some of Dad’s favorite shows like Lawrence Welk and Jeopardy and the Wheel of Fortune and then there’s the History channel. It was a pretty safe bet, that when you walked in the house either Victory at Sea or World at War were on. And, with Dad’s hearing going south, they were on loudly. And I remember how he kept his humor to the end. We recently lost our cousin Gene in Arizona and Dad really wanted to make the trip out there despite his poor health. He put on his best face and attended the funeral and the gathering afterwards over at Dan and Mercy’s. He did OK, but everyone knew he wasn’t his old self. When it came time to leave, he somehow pulled it together and called out, “…line up ladies…” That lit up the room. That would be the last time many of us saw him. Also at Gene’s funeral service, Joe painted a beautiful picture with words of our deceased relatives gathering for a picnic up in heaven. I can see Dad walking up to join them, cooler in hand, with our dogs, Bud and Lady at his side. Today Heaven is a little bit brighter, and certainly, a little bit louder. And Mom remembers their nightly Jeopardy matches and how one time she and I conspired to beat Dad. He usually won but this time I happened to travel out of state and I happened to call home while Jeopardy was on. I could easily hear the show in the background and it turned out we were one episode ahead of them. So the next night I wrote all the answers down and e-mailed Mom. The following night she was ready. And got most of the answers before my Dad. But, she tried to do a thinking-pause a couple times to make it look authentic, and that left Dad enough time to answer ahead of her. And, finally, Mom remembers their bedtime goodnights. She’d say goodnight and he’d start singing Always, ….. A song they shared. We love you, Dad. You’ll be missed. But you’ll be remembered, ALWAYS.

  13. Bridie & family, We will always remember George with great affection, we extend our sympathy to you and all the family. We were so glad that he got to spend some time with us in Ireland. May his soul rest peacefully.

  14. Our deepest sympathies to Bridie and family on George’s death RIP. You have such lovely memories of your long and happy years together. We will remember him in our prayers.

  15. First, my deepest sympathies go out to the Hanniff family. I first met the Hanniff’s in 1981 the very first day that we moved to California. From that day forward my bother and I and the Hanniff boys were great friends. We did everything together including our share of partying and sports and Mr. Hanniff was always an integral part of those activities. Some of my best times growing up were centered around stickball in the ally, softball at Skypark and the numerous picnics and functions that were usually spearheaded by Tom. Mr. Hanniff was a staple at all of these events. He was a great man and father and my heart goes out to the Hanniff family. Brigid, your dad is in a better place. Steve Jeffries

  16. Deep sympathy to you all on George’s passing away, even though we never met him we heard all about him from Golden and his big visit there. God Bless You All Breda & Roger

  17. Sincere sympathy to you all on the passing away of George. We will remember him in our prayers. Ned and Josie McGrath Ryan, Golden Sean,Pat,Eddie & Peig McGrath Golden, Co. Tipperary,Eire.

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